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Jan 10 2017

Are More Women Interested in Public Office Since the Election?

 
<img src="http://images1.westword.com/imager/u/745xauto/8651570/img_8669.jpg" alt="The 2016 presidential election motivated Brianna Buent
Sep 14 2015
Women have held less than 25 percent of all state legislative seats for years. But both parties are trying to recruit more female candidates.
Sep 8 2015
We spoke with candidate for Northglenn City Council, Ward 1, Jordan Sauers. Jordan is a Daniels Scholar and graduate of the University of Denver. During her time as a student, she served in numerous fellowships including the Colorado offices of the governor and the secretary of state. Jordan has extensive experience working with nonprofit and political groups and sits on various appointed commissions and boards, such as the Denver Commission on Aging, Colorado Collection Board Agency, Colorado Board of Marriage and Family Therapist Examiners, Colorado Common CauseLatino Young Philanthropists, and ACCESO.

LRHow did you get started in public service?

JS: As a young person, I always wanted to solve the problems of the world. I understood if I wanted things to change, I had to do them myself. After college, I knew that I needed to work hard and give back to my community that had given so much to me. I sought out internships and was fortunate enough to have remarkable ones from the Governor’s Office to the District Court Judge’s Office. I loved every moment and knew that [public service] would become my life-long calling.

LRWhy did you decide to get involved in politics?

JS: I wanted to be the change that I wished to see in the world. I wanted to give back to my community, and provide resources and opportunities to all regardless of any barriers one may face. Understanding what it means to overcome barriers, I wanted to make sure the world is a little better. It’s all about lifting people up and extending your arm where people are in need. My family grew up on Northglenn, and I wanted to make sure to invest in the community I grew up in and help them.

LRWho were your mentors?

JS: You know that phrase, “it takes a village to raise a child,” that was my scenario. I have been immensely blessed by the women in my life who have pushed me to aspire for more. My grandmother, great grandparents, District Court Judge Christine M. Arguello, and the First Latina Majority Leader Crisanta Duran. She’s [Crisanta] been remarkable. I think it’s one of those things where if you can see it, you can believe it. She has been an incredible mentor who’s helped me. She has inspired me to be more than I was yesterday. She believed in me and listened to me, and has never been afraid to bring a mentee along with her.

LRDid you have any doubts along the way?

JS: I think it’s one of those things where you ask yourself, “Am I ready? Do I have enough experience? Do I really want to do this?” and then just doing it. I think that it is a really big barrier to overcome to get yourself out there. But it makes it easier when you know that you will create change that you will give back to your community like you said you wanted to do.

When you see these women and you think if they have the courage to do this, then we should be doing it. We want to see the change and we want to see more Latinas in office, so we need to start somewhere. Even if you run and lose, not only do you learn, but we all learn. Latinas learn what we can do better the next time around.

LRWhat advice was given to you along the way?

JS: Always stay hungry for life and success. If you’re hungry, you need to remain humble and give back and extend your arm. It’s so easy to peak and be there alone. It takes a real woman and a strong woman to say, “I’ve made it, now it’s your turn. I am going to help you along the way.” It’s not about tearing each other down, we can’t afford that.

LRWhat can be done to increase the number of Latinas in public office?

JS: We, as Latinas, overcome so many barriers in life. We know how to fight and how to overcome, but I think we need to start accessing resources. Just being able to navigate these resources is challenging. It’s programs like [LatinasRepresent], Emerge, and VoteRunLead that give you the resources to put into your tool box and you think, one day…I will help you.

LRWhat advice do you have for next generation of Latina leaders?

JS: You know that nothing in life comes easy, and you will face multiple barriers along your path, but it’s important to tear them down for the ones who come after you. One thing that I tell myself everyday is I will not lose because I am at work. I will always work hard, and fight for what is right. That is something you wake up with in the morning, and go to bed at night. Even if you are tired, you just keep going!

Blog Posts

Oct 4 2016

Willford: More elected women needed in Colorado politics

The decision to run for public office can seem like a daunting one. That’s especially true for women, who are starkly underrepresented in offices in Colorado and face unique challenges as female candidates. However, for every reason to not run for office, there are ten reasons why women from Colorado should.

Maybe a woman feels like her needs and her family’s needs aren’t being prioritized by a legislature that’s 58 percent male. Another might be a retired teacher who can bring expertise and energy to her local school board. Others might simply look at the gender inequality in offices across Colorado and think, “Hey — our voices are needed too.”

Emerge America recently launched a campaign called #WhySheRuns to highlight Democratic women in office and to shed light on the forces that initially drove them to run. The #WhySheRuns videos are inspiring for a lot of reasons, but mainly because at the core of every woman’s decision was the same thing: a desire to create positive change in her community.

The Centennial State needs more passionate, qualified women in office. At Emerge Colorado, we recruit and train Democratic women because we have confidence in their potential and know the value they bring to governments. Our programs give women the skills they need to take the plunge into politics. We’re currently recruiting for our next class. If you or a woman you know already has their reason to run, applications are available at www.emergeco.org. We’ll take it from there.

Sep 29 2016

Thank you for your interest in participating in #WhySheRuns by making a video about why you decided to run for office. The voices of current and former women candidates and elected officials are critical if we are to spread the message of why it’s so important to support female candidates and inspire women women into the political arena.

HOW TO MAKE A VIDEO

Take your smart phone or another recording device and go to the camera function. Change it to video and as soon as you are ready, hit record.

Start your answer with the prompt: “I ran for office, because…” or “I decided to run for office, because…”.

Post it to Facebook or Twitter with one of the following generic messages, or create your own:

  • Here’s why I decided to run for office in [STATE]. Please like & share! #WhySheRuns
  • I knew that I could be a positive force in my community, so I ran for office. Please like & share! #WhySheRuns
  • I ran for office because I felt strongly about [INSERT ISSUE] and knew my voice was needed. #WhySheRuns
  • This is why I decided to run for office. Please like & share to help spread the word! #WhySheRuns

When you post, make sure to include the hashtag “#WhySheRuns” and, if there’s space, tag Emerge America and ask people to like and share it!

If you haven’t run for office before, your participation is still really important! Please visit Facebook and Twitter and like, share, comment on and retweet the videos! You can find them by searching #WhySheRuns on those sites.

 
Sep 1 2016

We Are Now Accepting Applications for the Class of 2017

This class marks our fifth year recruiting, training, and inspiring
Democratic women in Colorado to run for local office. 
 
 We continue to be the premiere
candidate training program in Colorado. 
 
If you are running for local office within the next 1-3 years,
or you know someone who is, Emerge Colorado is here to help.
 
 
 Join the growing number of women who have graduated from our program
 and whose voices are finally being heard at the decision-making
tables all across our state.
 
 
 
Do you know some who is or should be running for office?
 
Aug 29 2016

Over the last year, we've had an overwhelming demand for programming from across the state and we're answering that call!

Earlier this summer, we hired Leah Marvin-Riley as our Program Manager and just this month added three new Board Members who are ready to roll up their sleeves and join us in our efforts to build a bench of strong progressive women in Colorado. Read more about our new staff person and board members below!


Leah Marvin-Riley, Program Manager

Put Yourself On The Ballot

Learn about the Emerge program, how to apply and get connected to our Council of Allies

Support Our Work

Emerge Colorado needs your help to expand our training.